Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night | Bleachers

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Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night

Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night is the third studio album by American indie pop act Bleachers, released on July 30, 2021, by RCA Records. -Wikipedia

Critic Reviews

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  • The Guardian

    The super producer’s complex musical identity finds full expression on this highly personal third Bleachers album.  

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  • Rolling Stone

    The Top 40 super-producer dreams and strives and displays some serious Springsteen worship as he reaches for his unique vision of pop grandeur.  

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  • Stereogum

    No matter how chameleonic and nuanced Antonoff may be in the producer’s chair, Take The Sadness Out Of Saturday Night is further evidence of his strengths and limitations. When he’s not serving as a sounding board for some of pop’s most visionary artists, what’s left is an earnest millennial from New Jersey who knows how to translate his nostalgic longing into passionate sing-alongs 

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  • AllMusic

    Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night is a refreshingly different perspective on Bleachers and a heartfelt soundtrack to millennial midlife crises.  

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  • Gigwise

    Considering the strength of his other projects in the last year, it’s not a surprise that Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night isn’t Antonoff’s strongest work. At the heart of it all, though, is an incredibly fun record which will make you sing, dance, and fall in love all at once.  

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  • Spill Magazine

    If a handful of great-sounding singles from a guy who knows how to make great sounding music is enough for you, then you’re in for a real treat. Maybe one of those songs will even be the one you just need to play on repeat.  

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  • The Young Folks

    I do not consider many songs to be perfect—to me, a perfect song has to satisfy two things: the analytical, music-theory side of my brain, and the emotional, unexplainable and intangible part of my brain and my heart that provides an intrinsic and powerful connection to the music I love. Those two songs are perfect songs, and this record is just about as close to perfect as it gets.  

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  • The Indiependent

    For much of Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night, Antonoff and his band haven’t served up a bold statement of originality that is fitting of the creative producer. However, this does feel like a journey to the musical heart of the Jersey Shore. What Bleachers have given us is more than just a homage to the singer’s creative influences. To steal a quote from Springsteen himself this is a “heart-stopping, pants-dropping, hard-rocking, booty-shaking” joyful return. 

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  • The Appalachian

    “Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night” is a journey through Antonoff’s past and serves as a catalyst for conversations about mental health. Antoff’s most recent project tells a compelling and cohesive, track-by-track story about Antonoff’s childhood, love life and mental health struggles. Making catchy, indie-pop music is one of Antonoff’s greatest talents, and he has done it again with this album. 

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  • B-Sides

    Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night is an album of loss and rebirth, using observation-based introspection as a means for personal evolution. 

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  • NME

    riotous and reflective third album.  

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  • Sound Words STL

    Overall, I think this is an enjoyable album, but what concerns me is that it will likely become known too simplistically as the Bleachers record that has the Springsteen collaboration. And as much as I like Springsteen, I think it would be a disservice to not dig a little deeper. Ironically, the song that may have the appeal to Springsteen fans is one he’s not even on.  

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  • Evening Standard

    The in-demand songwriter/producer Jack Antonoff is back with his own band - and it’s a messy but essential listen. 

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  • The Needle Drop

    Saturday Night doesn't sound quite as methodical as Jack's work for other artists.  

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  • Redbrick Music

    Overall, with Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night I think that Bleachers have released an album that serves as a turning point. It lifts into its guitar rock roots and seeks out collaborations with giants of the sound like Springsteen, yet it also turns in within itself and ponders its own vulnerabilities. Its sense of limbo and uncertainty may be a deliberate choice, but I cannot help feel as if it would be something spectacular if given the space to truly delve into the potential of its sound.  

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  • Sputnik Music

    Baby we were born to run (out of ideas). Despite the blatant Springsteen worship, Antonoff still manages to pull a rabbit out of his hat.  

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  • Under the Radar Magazine

    While lacking the consistency and pure inspiration of Strange Desire, easily among the finest albums of its decade, Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night exceeds the value of its predecessor Gone Now. One might consider “Chinatown” a triumph and the album itself a small victory for the already busy Antonoff. While it may not be a major revelation, the new Bleachers album is bound to please.  

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  • Pitchfork

    On his third solo album, Jack Antonoff ends up splitting his time between careful rock songwriting and carefree pop singing, leaving a minor impression of both.  

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  • musicOMH

    Despite the album’s title, it all seems to end on a bit of a downer, with a trio of hushed acoustic ballads – although the final track What’d I Do With All This Faith does have some beautiful horn arrangements. It feels a bit too calculated to be genuinely affecting though. If he really lets himself go on the next Bleachers outing, Antonoff could well produce something the equal of his famous collaborators.  

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  • In Review Online

    Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night feels like: an album describing (musically) what other, better artists sound like. Despite this cribbing as content, there manages to be a few foot-tap worthy tracks to enjoy along the way, as Antanoff’s “signature” is rarely dull. But in keeping with the overarching reality of his career, the collaborations are the real highlight. 

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  • Paste Magazine

    Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night Is a Mess, Sopping Wet with Borrowed Mediocrity.  

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  • Flood Magazine

    Instead, it finishes abruptly, with no sense of resolution—the silence that follows only amplifies the promise of the heroes hiding in this record’s shadows and its inability to do them justice.  

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  • AllMusic

    More mature than either Strange Desire or Gone Now but just as life-affirming, Take the Sadness Out of Saturday Night is a refreshingly different perspective on Bleachers and a heartfelt soundtrack to millennial midlife crises.  

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  • Our Culture

    If there’s a hollowness to Saturday Night, it’s because it can’t possibly contain all this feeling, not even at its most euphoric. It’s the haunting kind. Like living in a dream you can’t escape, it takes a while before you realize you’ve been here before, and just like him, you can’t leave.  

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